Every Child – Vol. 22 No. 1 2016 – Professional learning and development

Anne Kennedy writes about reflective practice and how it can support ongoing professional learning and development. Manjula Waniganayake and Fay Hadley provide advice on choosing professional learning and how to make it work for individuals and organisations.
In other articles, Dr Georgie Nutton talks about the transition to belonging for refugees and asylum seekers, Catharine Hydon explores the topic of professionalism and ethics and Pam Linke encourages really listening to children in her article Hearing children’s voices.

The following articles are also included in this issue:

  • Leadership and professional evaluation
  • Welcome to y(our) place: An open door in action
  • Model of pedagogical leadership
  • Student practicum—it’s every educator’s business
  • Leadership … is an elective for diploma-qualified educators
  • The NQS goes to school
  • Efficiency in early childhood education
  • Mandatory reporting—make the call
  • ‘She’s a real artist’—Working with artists in early childhood settings
  • The heart of sustainability.

Child Development in Educational Settings

Child Development in Educational Settings provides a comprehensive introduction to traditional and contemporary theories of development and learning in the contexts of early childhood and primary education. Drawing upon the experiences and perspectives of children, families, educators and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander scholars, Marilyn Fleer provides insights into significant theories and approaches, including cultural-historical, constructivist, social constructivist, maturational and ecological systems. The book features four major case studies, which are revisited throughout, to examine how learning and development can be re-imagined within socially, culturally and linguistically diverse communities. This approach enables readers to use theories to analyse and measure learning and development in planning and curriculum, and to feel empowered to enact change in their educational settings. Written in an engaging and accessible style, Child Development in Educational Settings is an essential resource for pre-service teachers and professionals alike.

  • Provides a fresh, new approach to studying child development and learning
  • Focuses on significant contemporary theories and diverse perspectives to build a deep understanding of development and learning in culturally diverse contexts
  • Four major case studies illustrate learning and development within socially, culturally and linguistically diverse communities

Frameworks for learning and development (4th ed)

Features

  • End of chapter Q & A — ideal for class discussion and provide an opportunity for trainers to assess students understanding and application of content
  • Scenarios throughout the text – these provide practical examples, explore common issues and problems and enable students to link theory to practice
  • NEW to this edition resources for instructor’s support include testbank, additional cases, competency based activity sheets; provide homework setting options and more scenarios for students. NEW intermediate mapping grid included on instructor companion site to demonstrate the texts correlation with the competencies.
  • NEW to this edition for students – student companion website – CourseMate Express with interactive labelling activities, online research activities, quizzes, provide extension activities beyond the classroom.

About the author

Karen Kearns M. Ed. (EC), B. Ed. (EC), Grad. Dip. Ed. (Spec. Ed) Dip. Teach (EC), Cert. IV Training and Assessment. Karen is an early childhood professional and CEO of International Child Care college. Karen believes that being an educator/teacher in early childhood settings is both challenging and rewarding. A long-time advocate for educators, Karen is passionate about the importance of supporting educators in their critical role with young children and families.

Exploring Science with Young Children: A Developmental Perspective

About the authors

Terry Russell is emeritus professor at the University of Liverpool. He is a psychologist by background and training with a special interest in cognitive development as applied to the learning of science at all ages, but especially the younger age range. He taught in primary and secondary special needs schools and worked as an educational psychologist before finding opportunities into move into research. He has worked in Southeast Asia and Africa and at King’s College, London and directed the Centre for Research in Primary Science and Technology at the University of Liverpool for over twenty years. He has directed national and international projects and published extensively. This book reflects his commitment to evidence-based activity that improves teachers’ and pupils’ educational experiences, where theory informs practice through practical and accessible applications.

Dr Linda McGuigan has an established record of research into the emergence and development of science understanding in the Early Years. Formerly a primary teacher and Deputy Director of the Centre for Research in Primary Science and Technology at the University of Liverpool, Linda has conducted and managed research into children’s conceptual development in science, assessment and curriculum development. Attracting national and international interest, her work has been funded by national assessment and curriculum agencies. She has co-authored a number of books, reports, articles and digital and hard copy materials to support Early Years practice. Focusing on children’s conceptual progression, she brings a developmental perspective to science learning, teaching and assessment. Linda’s PhD investigated the impact of multimodal approaches on children’s science learning.  Multimodal learning continues to be an important feature of her research and professional development activities.

In the beginning: The brain, early development and learning

In the Beginning: The brain, early development and learning explores, synthesises and distils current knowledge of child development at the cutting edge of neuroscientific research.

With exceptional clarity, the author draws on empirical evidence to explain the brain’s remarkable capacity to change. From pre-conception to birth, and throughout the preschool and early school years, the importance of the environment and, most crucially, the presence of nurturing relationships will powerfully impact children’s lives. These critical factors will influence the innate ability of children to regulate their emotional responses, develop language skills, form social connections and fulfil their potential.

At once compelling and authoritative, In the Beginning provides a wealth of information for a diverse readership—including early childhood educators, health professionals, teachers and parents—with a shared interest in how the brain evolves, and how life’s experiences can dramatically shape the child.

What Does It Mean to Be Five?: A practical guide to child development in the early years

Given that children in their early years learn in a wide range of settings, it can be difficult to find resources to support their learning in your particular context. This What Does It Mean to Be …? series is relevant to any early childhood educator because its starting points are the principles of child development and a recognition that catering to the child?s uniqueness requires a broader focus than their role in any one setting. Each book provides practical information about the development needs or a particular age group, along with examples based on real children in real places and ideas on how educators can support learning and develop their own good practice. In combination, all these elements offer key information you need to see the children in your care thrive.

What Does It Mean to Be Four?: A practical guide to child development in the early years

Given that children in their early years learn in a wide range of settings, it can be difficult to find resources to support their learning in your particular context. This What Does It Mean to Be …? series is relevant to any early childhood educator because its starting points are the principles of child development and a recognition that catering to the child?s uniqueness requires a broader focus than their role in any one setting. Each book provides practical information about the development needs or a particular age group, along with examples based on real children in real places and ideas on how educators can support learning and develop their own good practice. In combination, all these elements offer key information you need to see the children in your care thrive.

What Does It Mean to Be Three?: A practical guide to child development in the early years

Given that children in their early years learn in a wide range of settings, it can be difficult to find resources to support their learning in your particular context. This What Does It Mean to Be …? series is relevant to any early childhood educator because its starting points are the principles of child development and a recognition that catering to the child?s uniqueness requires a broader focus than their role in any one setting. Each book provides practical information about the development needs or a particular age group, along with examples based on real children in real places and ideas on how educators can support learning and develop their own good practice. In combination, all these elements offer key information you need to see the children in your care thrive.

What Does It Mean to Be Two?: A practical guide to child development in the early years

Given that children in their early years learn in a wide range of settings, it can be difficult to find resources to support their learning in your particular context. This What Does It Mean to Be …? series is relevant to any early childhood educator because its starting points are the principles of child development and a recognition that catering to the child?s uniqueness requires a broader focus than their role in any one setting. Each book provides practical information about the development needs or a particular age group, along with examples based on real children in real places and ideas on how educators can support learning and develop their own good practice. In combination, all these elements offer key information you need to see the children in your care thrive.

What does it mean to be one?: A practical guide to child development in the early years

Given that children in their early years learn in a wide range of settings, it can be difficult to find resources to support their learning in your particular context. This What Does It Mean to Be …? series is relevant to any early childhood educator because its starting points are the principles of child development and a recognition that catering to the child’s uniqueness requires a broader focus than their role in any one setting. Each book provides practical information about the development needs or a particular age group, along with examples based on real children in real places and ideas on how educators can support learning and develop their own good practice. In combination, all these elements offer key information you need to see the children in your care thrive.