Assessment for Learning in the Early Years Foundation Stage

Looking at international perspectives and models of assessment, the book draws heavily on examples of real assessments from practice, and the relevant theory is explained in context. Lessons from research are applied to best practice, and issues covered include:

– self-assessment and peer assessment
– collecting evidence as a basis for making judgements
– how to track the child’s development in the six areas of learning
– using assessment to inform future planning
– summative assessment in the EYFS
– involving parents and carers in the assessment process
– using assessment to support children with additional needs
– moderation

Throughout the book there are plenty of practical examples from a range of early years settings, with case studies for the Birth to Five age range.

Students, teachers, teaching assistants and those working towards Early Years Professional Status (EYPS) will find this an invaluable guide.

Experiences in Movement and Music: Birth to Age Eight (5th ed.)

The text is the only one of its kind to teach movement?s role in traditional child development areas–physical, affective, and cognitive–as well as to detail musical and creative development. Experience in movement and music, fifth edition, presents an entire movement program, including lesson planning, guidelines for music selection and usage, developmentally appropriate teaching methods, and tried-and-true tips for creating and maintaining a positive learning environment with children on the move.

The exceptional child: Inclusion in early childhood education (8th edn)

The Developmental Behavioral approach and the importance of classroom arrangement are stressed throughout. Current research related to early childhood education and inclusion is also cited. The authors explain how to effectively work with a diverse group of children that may contain more than one child with significant challenges, and how to design optimal learning at the individual and group levels. In addition, the authors address how to give parents and caregivers a role in the special education process while encouraging children to gain independence and facilitating their self-care. Guidelines for working effectively with linguistically and culturally diverse children and families are woven throughout.

Table of Contents

SECTION 1: EARLY INTERVENTION AND PUBLIC POLICY.
1. An Inclusive Approach to Early Education.
2. Federal Legislation: Early Intervention and Prevention.
3. Inclusive Programs for Young Children.
Section 1 Wrap Up: Early Intervention & Public Policy.
SECTION 2: LIKENESSES AND DIFFERENCES AMONG CHILDREN.
4. Normal and Exceptional Development.
5. Developmental Disabilities: Causes and Classifications.
6. Sensory Impairments: Hearing and Vision.
7. Physical Disabilities and Health Problems.
8. Learning and Behavior Disorders.
Section 2 Wrap Up: Likenesses and Differences Among Children.
SECTION 3: PLANNING FOR INCLUSION.
9. Partnership with Families.
10. Assessment and the IFSP/IEP Process.
11. Characteristics of Effective Teachers in Inclusive Programs.
Section 3 Wrap Up: Planning for Inclusion.
SECTION 4: IMPLEMENTING INCLUSIVE EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS.
12. The Developmental-Behavioral Approach.
13. Arranging the Learning Environment.
14. Facilitating Self-Care, Adaptive, and Independence Skills.
15. Facilitating Social Development.
16. Facilitating Speech, Language, and Communication Skills.
17. Facilitating Pre-Academic and Cognitive Learning.
18. Managing Challenging Behaviors.
19. Planning Transitions to Support Inclusion.
Section 4 Wrap Up: Implementing Inclusive Early Childhood Programs.
Appendix A: Culminating Activities.
Appendix B: Skill Profile (0–72 Months).
Appendix C: Sources of Information, Support, and Training Material for Teachers and Parents of Children with Developmental Disabilities.
Appendix D: Early Learning and Developmental Diversity.
Appendix E: Sample IFSP Form.
Glossary.
References.
Index.

About the Authors

Eileen K. Allen

Eileen K. Allen, Professor Emerita, University of Kansas, spent 30 years as a professor of child development and early childhood education at the University of Washington in Seattle and the University of Kansas at Lawrence. Throughout her career, Eileen was active in national and international organizations focused on the development of young children and their families, including NAEYC, the Commission on Early Childhood Teacher Education, the Council for Exceptional Children, and the National Association of Early Childhood Teacher Educators (NAECTE).

Glynnis Edwards Cowdery

Glynnis Edwards Cowdery has more than 25 years of experience in the early childhood education field as a teacher, program director, and inclusion facilitator.

 

Observations and reflections in childhood

Quality assessment, or documentation, is a key aspect of providing best practice in early childhood settings. Using real-life examples, Observations and reflections in childhood supports professionals in recording children’s learning and development during everyday activities. This Australian text explains how to: observe children and gather a range of documentation interpret documentation using different theoretical perspectives program using the strengths and interests identified in documentation share documentation with others. Diane Szarkowicz is a senior lecturer in the Faculty of Education, Health and Science at Charles Darwin University. She has worked in early childhood and primary education settings, and taught in the areas of assessment and developmental psychology at a tertiary level.

Every Child—Vol. 24 No. 2 2018: Reflecting on Pedagogy

Pedagogy is about children and their rights as capable, competent, learning members of our communities. This latest edition of Every Child reflects on pedagogy, starting with a Guest Statement from Rhonda Livingstone, National Education Leader and General Manager at the Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA). Rhonda talks about pedagogy as being a reflection on practice and professional decision making on ways to support children’s learning, development and wellbeing.

Bernadette Hayes shares an example of pedagogy in action as she talks about her school’s responsive approach to supporting children who have experienced trauma; Coral Campbell and Chris Speldewinde give examples of educators who followed children’s interest in science, learning with and alongside them; and Julie-Anne Oke unpacks writing as she discusses her kindergarten class’s journey through a ‘Writer’s Workshop’ to allow them to see themselves as beginning authors.

In other articles, ECA National President, Ros Cornish, reflects on years of advocacy work as ECA celebrates its 80th birthday; and Melissa Griffiths and Sandie Wong write about how a parent collaborated with educators and children to develop an artwork recreating The Rainbow Serpent Dreamtime story.

The following articles are also included in this issue:

  • Quality outcomes for children—taking steps backwards to move forwards
  • How does ECA work—how can you support your local branch?
  • Unleashing leadership at every level
  • The homework debate for young learners
  • Ethical encounters with cultural competence
  • Embed, Enable and Strive: ECA’s Reconciliation Action Plan 2017–2020
  • Shifting the car park conversations: Creating outdoor spaces for and with families
  • STEM practice in early childhood settings
  • Healthy breathing habits can help calm and focus children.

Intentional teaching of cultural competence in play-based settings: A cultural-historical view

One of the practice principles in the Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) is cultural competence. This book explores what this means in the context of the different theories of child development, as discussed in the EYLF: developmental theories, socio-behaviourist theories, critical theories, post-structuralist theories and sociocultural theories (cultural-historical theory). In drawing upon the latest research, the explanations of practices presented in this resource are from a cultural-historical perspective.

The EYLF suggests that educators identify their own view of cultural competence. In keeping with this recommendation, the resource supports educators through presenting examples of intentional teaching ideas, scenarios and reflective questions. Examples of practices are presented alongside reflective questions such as: What can everyone see? What can only the family see? What can we no longer see because it is so much a part of our lives? Cultural-historical theory recognises and gives directions on how educators with different views can work effectively together and with families.

The book also recognises and works with the different views that multi-disciplinary teams bring to their work. It introduces three different cultural-historical concepts—Relational agency, Common knowledge and Relational expertise—that support the building of cultural competence. These concepts work together to help educators in planning with other professionals for the development of cultural competence.

About the Research in Practice Series:

The Research in Practice Series is published four times each year by Early Childhood Australia.

The Research in Practice Series is a practical, easy-to-read resource, offering effective new approaches for those challenging issues which arise in the care and education of young children. Each issue explores current and emerging research on a specialised topic within early childhood education and care and translates it into practical case studies, ideas and strategies for modern pedagogical practices.

Each issue can be purchased individually, or subscribe to receive a publication every quarter. Additionally, all subscribers to the Research in Practice Series receive access to specially developed presentations designed to take learning further, perfect to be shared during team meetings. To learn more about subscribing, click here. 

Connecting with toddlers

Connecting with toddlers is a resource for educators who are beginning their own learning journey about toddlers and for those who want to strengthen their enthusiasm, enjoyment and professional satisfaction in working with toddlers. It may also be useful to more experienced educators as a resource in mentoring others.

This book explores the complexity of toddlers’ lives and provides a snapshot of their development to support adults to accept, understand and respond to toddlers as they are.

It discusses practices that will help educators to be connected when working with toddlers, including:

  • knowing as much as you can about toddlers and their development and learning
  • responding to toddlers respectfully as individuals
  • building relationships and focusing on interactions with toddlers and their families
  • planning programs and activities carefully, allowing for space, exploration and choice.

Connecting with toddlers will support educators to engage in good professional practice and enjoy relaxed, successful and satisfying dealings with toddlers as the energetic, delightful, capable and sometimes puzzling and challenging young people that they are. It encourages educators to engage in further learning and suggests resources to support this.

The Research in Practice Series is published four times each year by Early Childhood Australia.

The Research in Practice Series is a practical, easy-to-read resource, offering effective new approaches for those challenging issues which arise in the care and education of young children. Each issue explores current and emerging research on a specialised topic within early childhood education and care and translates it into practical case studies, ideas and strategies for modern pedagogical practices.

Each issue can be purchased individually, or subscribe to receive a publication every quarter. Additionally, all subscribers to the Research in Practice Series receive access to specially developed presentations designed to take learning further, perfect to be shared during team meetings. To learn more about subscribing, click here. 

Children’s rights: Every day and everywhere – Book 2

Topics highlighted in Book 2 of Children’s rights: Every day and everywhere include:

  • children’s rights—inspirations, challenges and misunderstandings
  • interpreting and enacting rights for children every day, everywhere
  • children’s right to play
  • teaching children about rights.

About the Everyday Learning Series:

Early Childhood Australia’s Everyday Learning Series acknowledges that the most important early learning happens through day-to-day life experiences and provides ideas and strategies on ways educators and families can make the most of these experiences to support children’s development. By ‘making the ordinary, extraordinary’, the Everyday Learning Series is an invaluable resource for educators, students of early education, beginning practitioners, and families by assisting them in maximising young children’s play, exploration and discovery, and development within learning environments.

Subscribe to the Everyday Learning Series:

The Everyday Learning Series (EDL) is a 12 month, four-issue subscription. Subscribers also receive bonus online resources which may be shared with educators and families. Learn more here. 

ECA offers libraries and institutions a perpetual access fee. Please contact ECA directly on 1800 356 900 (free call) to obtain the licensing agreement or to order.

Early Childhood Australia Membership

Membership of ECA ensures that you are kept informed of the latest practice, research and policy in the sector while also accessing exclusive benefits and discounts. Most importantly, you will be supporting ECA to be a voice for young children. Our membership encompasses service providers across a diversity of service types and governance structures (e.g. private, not-for-profit and public).

  • Concession: For individuals studying early childhood education or equivalent, or unemployed, retired or on extended leave
  • Professional: For early childhood education and care professionals who work with or for young children, their families and carers
  • School/Service: For early childhood services, schools and other organisations working directly with young children and their families
  • Institution: For universities, research institutions, RTOs, local, state and federal government agencies, and other institutions

Your membership of ECA enhances our capacity to be a strong voice for children. Membership is tax deductible for individuals who work in the sector.

Non-Australia residents can also sign up to ECA membership—additional charges are applied to cover postage of information and resources.

Members also benefit from our strong media profile and policy development capabilities, with opportunities to contribute to the national policy debate and demonstrate a commitment to building the capacity of the early childhood education sector more broadly. We also provide members, who wish to be involved, with the opportunity to participate in media stories.

Current third-party discounts:

  • The Hanen Centre offers online seminars with a 20 per cent discount for ECA members.
  • ECA members can apply for a 30 per cent discount on the Torrens University Master of Education in Early Childhood. For more details contact Course and Career Advisor Alexandra Phillipou at enquiries@tua.edu.au

Multi-Service Member Packages

These member packages are for large provider organisations and authorities with multiple services or schools (five or more) that would like to coordinate access to ECA products.

Price on application—bundled discounts on multiple services and schools also available. Centralised discounted invoicing across multiple sites with an account manager and discount code.

Contact us today: customerservice@earlychildhood.org.au or call 1800 356 900 (free call in Australia).


International Members surcharge applies.
Contact us for details at customerservice@earlychildhood.org.au.

Box of Leadership Provocations

The 48 provocation cards are organised under the six capabilities outlined in the ECA Leadership Capability Framework, with each capability written by a different author:

  • Focus on learning and development by Anne Stonehouse
  • Creating cohesive and effective teams by Anthony Semann
  • Building professional relationships by Susan Irvine
  • Children’s rights by Catharine Hydon
  • Building partnerships by Michelle Gujer
  • Ethical inquiry by Leanne Gibbs.